Tuesday, 29 August 2017

Bloody Waves Audio!!!

So Waves Audio has another sale.

Only this time, they push down prices to the lowest I can remember.

Yep, I fell for it.

The CLA Classic Compressors bundle comprises four compressor limiters, based on units owned by renowned producer, Chris Lord-Alge. Included are emulations of the Teletronix LA-2A (CLA-2A - see what they did there?), the Teletronix LA-3A (CLA-3A - amazing huh?) and two versions of the Urei 1176 (CLA-76 Blacky based on the Revision D-LN Blackface and the CLA-76 Bluey based on the Revision B, also known as the Silverface Bluestripe). Only briefly tried them out and they do sound pretty good so far.


Also purloined at a VERY good price was the new F6 dynamic EQ - sort of like a multi-band compressor but based on EQ. It makes sense, honestly. Sound-wise, early to say, but I can see that it will get a lot use, particularly with the C4 multi-band compressor which is one of my favourite and definitely most-used plugins.


And lastly, the Abbey Road Reverb Plates, a plate reverb (as if you hadn't guessed) based on the four massive reverb plates housed in the Abbey Road Studios in London. Again, first plays with it, using a loop from Spectrasonics Stylus RMX, are really quite interesting and the effect is quite lovely.


They have the Studio Classics Collection (stonking emulations of API, SSL and Neve consoles) up for a mere $199 - but I can't quite stretch to it!!! :-(

Tuesday, 22 August 2017

An emptied purse!!!

Just had a week off work with just about the nastiest throat infection I've ever had and a bout of sinusitis which I NEVER want to have or experience again. Sadly, this caused me to miss the Modular Meet in Leeds last Saturday (19th August) and I spent my birthday (Sunday 20th August) surrounded by used tissues and issuing dark green mucous at an alarming rate - it was like a scene from "The Exorcist"!!!

Anyway, the sad story now told, the time off work gave me a valuable opportunity to have a good think about things in general as well as time to learn about a few of the bits and pieces of software I have gathered over last couple of years. And, surprise surprise, a couple of new bits of programming (one of which is VERY much more than a bit).

First up was a new product from Audio Damage (based on three of their older products) called QuatroMod. It basically takes their classic through-zero flanger called Liquid, their multi-mod chorus Fluid, their diffusion chorus Vapor and their Eurorack hardware frequency shifter FreqShift and put them all into a single plug-in, and let me tell you, it's a really powerful stereo-insert modulation plug.


Also from Audio Damage (who are releasing some stonking upgrades to their products of late) is Replicant 2, a damn fine Fuck Shit Up (FSU) plugin. A very well featured looping delay/buffer effects unit, you can get some seriously wierd shit out of this thing. It's great with everything you put through it, but I'm really enjoying shoving different loops from Spectrasonics Styus RMX through it's delays and filters, some quite lovely fractured rhythmic somethings happening all the time.


Sticking with Audio Damage for a third time, another upgrade this time to their Phosphor synthesizer, this new version being......Phosphor 2. Based on the vintage alphaSyntauri digital additive synthesizer, this gives you a couple of additive oscillators (with the original 16 partial complement of the alphaSyntauri, or optionally with 32 or 64 partials), each with its own amp envelope, closely following the alphaSyntauri. Naturally it has a lot of added modern features such as full velocity control, a full-on modulation routing system, tempo synced LFOs, a couple of delays, and two monophonic modes, plus host of other enhancements and tweaks. I really liked the first version, but I love Phosphor 2.


I've added D16 Group's excellent emulation of the Roland TR-808 drum machine to my drum/percussion collection. Called Nepheton, it's a sparkling companion to their fab TR-909 emulation Drumazon. It sounds great and is a joy to program.


One piece of processing software I've been waiting patiently to get is PSP Audioware's VintageWarmer 2, a really cool analog-style, a single- or multi-band compressor/limiter. I love multi-band compressor/limiters as they can really open up your mix (if used very carefully) and VintageWarmer 2 has a very good reputation. I saw this being used by David Wright and Dave Massey (AD Music, Code Indigo and Callisto) and was always impressed by it's sound. I now have it and hurrah for that :-D


An impulse buy that has proven to be a good buy was Panagement from Auburn Sounds. They describe it as a spatialisation toolbox, and you know, I can't disagree with that description. It's essentially a panning tool with added extras that lets you control stereo space quickly using a number of well-thought out features. I've been using it a lot with rhythm loops and the effect is very pleasing - as an experiment I worked it alongside Waves Audio's Brauer Motion plugin and discovered a very cool partnership between the two. Highly useful for adding depth and movement to the mix. Recommended.


And so to my latest "investment". After a bit of mulling about whether or not I really needed to take this particular path, I finally decided that yes, it was time to subscribe to the EastWest/Quantum Leap ComposerCloud X. This subscription gives me access to a huge array of software products that covers 10,000 of the most detailed, professional-quality virtual instruments, with a total combined monetary value of more than $12,500 (that's about £9800 in proper money). One year's subscription doesn't even cover the cost of one product and there's something like 59 products with new releases being added to the plan automatically. So what do you get? Pianos, choirs, full orchestras and solo orchestral instruments, drums, percussion, loops, synths and pretty much everything else. From what little time I've spent with it, the overall product is of a hugely high quality and very configurable - more learning!!! I'm predominantly interested in the orchestral and choral aspects, though I have to say I have found some of the ethnic instruments to be very useful.


With the addition of the ComposerCloud X, I think that any future software acquistions will have to be carefully thought out as I am running out of hard drive space!!!

Whilst being off work, I've been looking at the generative software Noatikl, from Intermorphic, that I got a while ago. I set up one instance of Omnisphere 2, putting it into multi-output mode (8 channels) and then added Noatikl a the start of the chain ahead of Omnisphere 2. Have a listen to what I achieved here:



This is the on-screen appearance of Noatikl with Omnisphere 2: